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Iowarth View Drop Down
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    Posted: 14 Aug 2017 at 1:10pm
Hi everyone

I get chastised for not posting more of my own sightings while nagging everyone else. This is largely due to that fact that this is a very visual medium and my photographic skills are negligible even if it occurs to me to try!

Anyway, we had a large, probably female, grass snake around a metre long arrive in our pond yesterday (actually the first I have seen this year which is unusual. So here are some snaps of her. I fear that the large bulge in her is "Plop", my favourite frog! Nonetheless, she is more than welcome.





Chris Davis, Site Administrator

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GemmaJF View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GemmaJF Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Aug 2017 at 3:07pm
She looks a bit of a beast Chris. I guess though 'plop' will keep her going for a couple of weeks Confused We had one big female in earlier in the year, at the moment it seems to be just a couple of sub-adults, both remaining elusive unless whilst shedding, in which case they are under the felts. Last spotted them in the compost.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Iowarth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Aug 2017 at 4:07pm
She is indeed a beast Gemma. The metre estimate was intentionally understated but this afternoon I saw her on the move and I would take that up to a good 4 feet. Noticeable that her head is considerably more massive than either of two four foot corn snakes I have as well as being fatter. I mourn Plop but this is one lovely snake!
Chris Davis, Site Administrator

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GemmaJF Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Aug 2017 at 4:23pm
Yep it fits with my observations of bigger grassies in the 4 foot range, their heads are really big!

We had a similar story to poor old 'Plop'. Going back now to the first incarnation of our pond I was totally overjoyed to spot the one and only local frog that ever used it. A large female. 

With excitement I went out the next day to see if it was still there. Half hidden in the grass I saw the first large grass snake to visit. The excitement though was a little soured when I realised there was a big bulge about half way down... ...oops so that was why many years later I introduced frogs, we only had that one single visit and it was pretty short lived. Wink

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tom Omlette Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Aug 2017 at 8:38am
great pics chris. poor plop Cry

tim


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