the online meeting place for all who love our amphibians and reptiles
Home Page Live Forums Archived Forums Site Search Identify Record Donate Projects Links
Forum Home Forum Home > Herpetofauna Native to the UK > Common Toad
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - "White" common toad
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

"White" common toad

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
Mark_b View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 26 Jun 2008
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 155
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mark_b Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: "White" common toad
    Posted: 13 Jun 2012 at 5:46pm
Back to Top
GemmaJF View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 Jan 2003
Location: Essex
Status: Offline
Points: 4334
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GemmaJF Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jun 2012 at 6:45pm
We having a run on 'white' animals Wink Thanks for sharing Mark.
Back to Top
tim hamlett View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 17 Dec 2006
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 1062
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tim hamlett Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jun 2012 at 9:56pm
very interesting...lovely looking animal

tim
Back to Top
will View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 27 Feb 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 1824
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote will Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Jun 2012 at 6:50am
nice! I wonder what the correct technical term for this colouration is - would it be amelanistic? 
Back to Top
liamrussell View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 13 Jan 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 100
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote liamrussell Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Jun 2012 at 10:56am
Originally posted by will will wrote:

nice! I wonder what the correct technical term for this colouration is - would it be amelanistic? 

Isn't this an albino? It had pink eyes. Albinos only lack melanin so often appear a bit yellowish.

I found a huge albino toad a few years ago. Obviously no camera that dayDisapprove
Back to Top
sussexecology View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 30 Sep 2010
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 411
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sussexecology Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Jun 2012 at 9:33pm





Edited by sussexecology - 15 Jun 2012 at 8:30pm
Back to Top
Caleb View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 11 Apr 2011
Status: Offline
Points: 658
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Caleb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jun 2012 at 9:57am
Originally posted by liamrussell liamrussell wrote:


Isn't this an albino? It had pink eyes. Albinos only lack melanin so often appear a bit yellowish.


It has no melanin (hence the pink eyes), so it is amelanistic. 'Albino' is a bit imprecise. The term was first used for mammals, where melanin is the only pigment. This means for mammals, albinism and amelanism are the same thing. In other animals, 'albino' is sometimes reserved for specimens with no pigment at all (which will appear white, like albino mammals), and sometimes used for specimens like this one, which clearly has pigments other than melanin.

There are some more pictures of 'albino' toads on the old forum (including two from me):
http://www.herpetofauna.org.uk/forum_archive/forum_posts.php?forum_id=15&Topic_ID=559&Subject=Albino%20toad%20pics&PN=1
Back to Top
sussexecology View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 30 Sep 2010
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 411
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sussexecology Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jun 2012 at 8:34pm

I've edited out my colleagues previous comments so that this thread makes more sense. Albino is referred to a white animal - whether it is a mammal or amphibian, reptile etc, etc.
Amelanistic is a bit more posh way of saying it has no melarin.
In fact we are all referring to the same ecological term, whether it is albino or amelanistic.

Why are we getting so many white animals recorded at the moment, that is a question that i would like to ask.
Back to Top
GemmaJF View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 Jan 2003
Location: Essex
Status: Offline
Points: 4334
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GemmaJF Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jun 2012 at 10:44pm
um because people like to post them up! Wink

As these conditions are controlled by recessive genes they are going to crop up in populations at some point. How it effects the individuals animals survivorbility in the wild is perhaps the big question. Interesting that we are seeing adult animals that are surviving in the last couple of threads.

I think the distinctions between albino, amelanistic, leucism etc are worth understanding but very often they are best understood by captive breeders who may select for these traits, so they understand the phenotypes in terms of exactly what the genes are doing. I certainly wouldn't get too hung up about any of it myself. To 99% of people a white animal is albino. I only pulled up Jon on the other thread because I was 100% sure it was not just a light coloured slow worm about to slough that had been posted up.


Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.06
Copyright ©2001-2016 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.157 seconds.