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2017 taddies

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Liz Heard View Drop Down
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    Posted: 25 May 2017 at 7:19pm
Whoa! That's more tads than water Rob!

Going back to Gemma's question of which fish species are known to shun toad tadpoles, i remember an angler's pond with plenty of Common Carp, around 15 colossal American Catfish, and hundreds of (invasive alien species) Topmouth Gudgeon, along with smaller numbers of Perch, Roach and Rudd (and possibly other species that i can't remember)....yet toad larvae.
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Robert V View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Robert V Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 May 2017 at 7:38am
And if you think that was just one area - wrong... there is about a dozen of these shoals that I could see and its a relatively small pond.
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Robert V View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Robert V Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 May 2017 at 7:25am
And in my humble estimation, there appears to be more taddies because less grass snakes, I may be wrong.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Robert V Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 May 2017 at 7:16am
Hello all,
 
it's been a while...
 
Tads eh! Yesterday at Battlesbridge. And there seems to be two things to say on this. One, Mirror . Common Carp do not eat, or eat very few Taddies. I know this because in the pond where this was taken, are Mirrors, Koi, Commons and Grass carp. the shoals of Taddies are massive this year. But no Grass Snakes last year or this, and its not through lack of inspections. So if we're all still here in a few years, I shall report back on how many common toads / frogs return in adulthood and survive the A roads...
RobV
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GemmaJF Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Apr 2017 at 8:15pm
Originally posted by PondDragon PondDragon wrote:

Originally posted by GemmaJF GemmaJF wrote:

I was surprised when we had toad taddies a few years back that quite a few invert predators would prey on them.

My assumption was this was why toads tended to breed in larger ponds with fish - their toxins keep them relatively safe from fish predation, but the fish keep down numbers of other tadpole predators such as newts and invertebrates. This would also explain the shoaling behaviour - having tried one and found it unpalatable, a fish would be likely to leave the rest of the shoal alone. Having said that I've never actually seen any data on how much different fish species do prey on / avoid toad tadpoles, so I'd be interested if anyone knows of any research on the subject.

Conversely frogs can avoid the same predators by breeding in water bodies so temporary that drying out keeps predator numbers low, albeit at the risk of early desiccation. Presumably the risk of mass mortality in a dry year is outweighed by the high success rate in other years.

I think this is often the case. I only recently read about the aggregation behaviour having links with predator avoidance, it was always a behaviour that I found fascinating.

I have not seen research on which particular species of fish will prey on toad tadpoles. I can though anecdotally report that I have known thriving toad populations in large gravel pits containing a very good variety of stocked still water fish species. So it suggests a good range of fish species do learn to leave them alone.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PondDragon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Apr 2017 at 6:17pm
Originally posted by GemmaJF GemmaJF wrote:

I was surprised when we had toad taddies a few years back that quite a few invert predators would prey on them.

My assumption was this was why toads tended to breed in larger ponds with fish - their toxins keep them relatively safe from fish predation, but the fish keep down numbers of other tadpole predators such as newts and invertebrates. This would also explain the shoaling behaviour - having tried one and found it unpalatable, a fish would be likely to leave the rest of the shoal alone. Having said that I've never actually seen any data on how much different fish species do prey on / avoid toad tadpoles, so I'd be interested if anyone knows of any research on the subject.

Conversely frogs can avoid the same predators by breeding in water bodies so temporary that drying out keeps predator numbers low, albeit at the risk of early desiccation. Presumably the risk of mass mortality in a dry year is outweighed by the high success rate in other years.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Suzi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Apr 2017 at 4:44pm
Same here with pond levels. I don't think I've seen the larger pond so low at this time of year. It's not exactly because of tropical temperatures either. It's almost impossible to watch the newts as the water has got so green.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Iowarth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Apr 2017 at 1:46pm
Hi Gemma

Yes, even the tads are preyed on. I have seen them fall prey to dragon and damsel fly larvae as well as water scorpions and back swimmers.

Well spotted on the pond level. Currently about 2 inches down and no sign of rain until Monday or Tuesday - and that's not guaranteed! It has been a very dry April down here coupled with lots of sunshine but very cold easterly to northerly winds - a great recipe for water evaporation1

I'm taking the hint re my garden! I really need to remember that my smart phone takes piccies - that'll help!

All the best
Chris
Chris Davis, Site Administrator

Co-ordinator, Sand Lizard Captive Breeding Programme (RETIRED)
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GemmaJF View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GemmaJF Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Apr 2017 at 1:21pm
Brilliant to see Chris. I was surprised when we had toad taddies a few years back that quite a few invert predators would prey on them. 

Is your pond level down a bit? We have had barely any rain this month in Essex. The clay pond looks more like one would expect in mid-August, down several inches. I have filled a couple of butts with tap water for a top-up. 

Now you cannot get out so much in the field, perhaps keep up us updated with the garden sighting? You have species in the garden most of us can only dream of seeing on a daily basis. Thumbs Up
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Tom Omlette View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tom Omlette Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Apr 2017 at 9:33pm
well i suppose at 70 you've probably earned a rest. I'm sure you'll be missed though Clap

tim

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