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STOBOROUGH HYDE HEATH obliteration

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Suzy View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Suzy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Nov 2013 at 11:04pm
I've realised over the years that although the RSPB say they manage sites for all flora and fauna, that isn't really so where I live. Their management is heavily skewed towards birds, hence all the scraping and flattening.
We all have tales of lost little patches (or not so little) where every year we might reliably expect to see something, be it a plant, butterfly, insect or, yes, even a bird. Now no more due to heavy handed obliteration of habitat.
All very sad.
Suz
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AGILIS View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AGILIS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Nov 2013 at 5:44am

Some silly names that RSPB really stands for any more ideas .

Royal society prefers birds
Reptile site place bulldozed
Rather scrape places barren
Real stupid prats biased
THIS WAS THE BULLDOZING ON HYDE HEATH A FEW YEARS BACK
FOR those newer members,just what RSPB managements about. no dout its covered in foliage by now ,but the animal wont have recovered.
keith[IMG]


Edited by AGILIS - 10 Nov 2013 at 9:31am
   LOCAL ICYNICAL CELTIC ECO WARRIOR AND FAILED DRUID
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GemmaJF View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GemmaJF Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Nov 2013 at 2:02pm
In very many cases they will argue the work is necessary and will benefit in the long-term.

My own monitoring of local sites that have undergone this kind of 'management' using plant machinery shows otherwise. Often there is an initial increase in sightings (as might be expected as surviving animals are pushed into smaller areas of habitat) followed by declines in overall numbers.

As the areas recover (if they are allowed to depending on if they are mowed/grazed etc.) the animals do not return. The vegetation might look promising but as can be seen clearly from Keith's first picture the surface soil structure is destroyed. This is extremely imported for a whole range of smaller animals and would take decades to recover, if it ever did.

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Robert V View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Robert V Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Nov 2013 at 12:39pm
I saw this today...
 
 
 
It shows the ignorance at Government levels regarding soil structure, length of time to create sites etc etc. I would like to know how the populations of those translocations from Thames Gateway to Wiltshire have held up. I bet there's massive losses.
 
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