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GemmaJF View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GemmaJF Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 May 2014 at 2:00pm
Originally posted by Paul Ford Paul Ford wrote:

Well I think its about time I updated this thread.

 

I’ve been a busy boy over the last 21 months or so and installed 4 smallish ponds (all dug out by hand! – and some through a layer of slate!!)

 

I’ve made hibernacula from piles of rubble and earth, brash piles, log piles and trailered in horse manure to create a compost heap. I’ve left un-mown areas, created natural refugia with logs and slabs and put down nearly a dozen tins. (I’ve also built myself a large outdoor vivarium which has been immensely satisfying but I guess not really for this forum).

 

Last year I rescued some frogspawn last year and put them in one of the ponds.

 

We found slow worms and toads quite early on which was nice but what I really wanted was grass snakes (I admit to being a little obsessed! I haven’t been out herping this year yet and am starting to get twitchy – I need a regular grass snake fix!).

 

Well guess what!?

 

Last Friday I casually lifted a tin expecting to see maybe a slowie and there ‘s a baby grass snake sat there – not much more than hatchling size! To say I was chuffed is an understatement! – I was straight on the phone to my girlfriend whilst I turned the next tin and guess what..? another young grassy, this one about a foot long!

 

I’ve been reading Richard’s book which has taken me back to my childhood and I remember as plain as day the awe and wonder of my first grass snake – I’m 47 now and the feeling wasn’t dissimilar! (I guess it’s the satisfaction of knowing that all the effort I put in has paid off – or possibly because I’m still a big kid).

 

My computer is playing up at the mo but I will post up some pictures soon. Wink

 

Paul


Excellent news Paul and I fully appreciate the feeling of achievement. I got the same feeling seeing the first grass snake in the wildlife garden, it's amazing! If  yourr compost heaps are good heat producers there will soon be plenty of little bootlace grassies under those tins. Smile
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Tom Omlette View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tom Omlette Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 May 2014 at 4:50pm
well done mate! and well deserved Smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Iowarth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 May 2014 at 7:45pm
Well done Paul - it all becomes very worthwhile quite quickly.

I think that most of us are still big kids - at least WE haven't lost the kid's ability to go WOW! when we see another lovely herp!

Chris
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Suzy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 May 2014 at 9:38pm
As someone who has encouraged herps on a much smaller scale I know how excited you must be to see stuff arrive. Well done! Keep us up to date with it all.
Suz
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Richard2 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 May 2014 at 10:39pm
Sounds wonderful! And I'm glad you liked the book.

Richard
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paul Ford Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2016 at 2:23pm
A new visitor to the paddock:



I was very surprised (and very pleased!) to find palmate newts in one of the ponds
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Iowarth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2016 at 3:31pm
Excellent Paul - you'll soon rival my garden on native species ........... or do you already?

Chris
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paul Ford Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 May 2016 at 12:04pm
Hi Chris,

I have slow worms and grass snakes as I know you do but I don't think I can improve on that although I'd love to have lizards which I think you have....?

On the phib front I have frogs, toads and the palmate newts and I think there is half a chance that I might get lucky like Suzy one day and find a crestie but that could just be wishful thinking on my part...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Iowarth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 May 2016 at 8:57pm
Hi Paul
Yes, I have all the widespread species in the garden. Adders very rarely although they are common very nearby. Common lizards as well although the plethora of cats (not mine - she just looks at them!) means we don't see that many unfortunately although they DO hang in there!
All the best
Chris
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