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Please can you identify

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AGILIS View Drop Down
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Joined: 27 Feb 2007
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AGILIS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Aug 2017 at 7:39am
Took the words out my mouth could be a glass snake if near a metre long but it looks like a spotty slowie to me perhaps some exaggeration in its length if reported by a amateur not used to snake and reptile sighting ?? Keith
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GemmaJF View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GemmaJF Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Aug 2017 at 12:31pm
We had a thread way back in 2008 on the  largest slow worms


Just re-reading I noted Steve had a whopper from Hindhead Common in Surrey, this is where I've seen some huge specimens too. Interestingly as well I notice a different look to the head on some of the largest males. I wondered if it is a sign of extreme age.

Regarding estimating length nearly everyone tends to be a bit over, it is only when you know that people do it, then you tend to be conservative and probably underestimate a bit. Wink

Looking at the thread I think Seaford has a new contender for largest slow worm there!
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