the online meeting place for all who love our amphibians and reptiles
Home Page Live Forums Archived Forums Site Search Identify Record Donate Projects Links
Forum Home Forum Home > General > Associated Fauna and Flora
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Non-reptile fauna under tins
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Non-reptile fauna under tins

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
Vicar View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 02 Sep 2004
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 1184
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vicar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Non-reptile fauna under tins
    Posted: 09 Feb 2006 at 4:13pm

I'm constantly amused to find all types of animals lurking under the tins we lay out for reptiles. I thought it might be fun to post some pics.

This little chap was shivering under a tin in NE Hants yesterday afternoon...soz about the poor quality it was a fast mover !

What is he?..common vole ?

Steve Langham - Chairman    
Surrey Amphibian & Reptile Group
Back to Top
herpetologic2 View Drop Down
Forum Coordinator
Forum Coordinator
Avatar

Joined: 15 Jun 2004
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 1511
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote herpetologic2 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Feb 2006 at 5:38am

 

Isnt it short tailed or long tailed bank vole?

You know that tinning is a method for surveying water shrews - and there are a hell of lot of any beasties that live under tins

JC

Back to Top
evilmike View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 15 May 2004
Status: Offline
Points: 85
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote evilmike Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Feb 2006 at 10:03am

ive found vole nests under tins and carpet, the pink baby voles are so cute, ive got some pics,if i can get them posted correctly fingers crossed.

 



Edited by evilmike
Mike Lister BSc hons Ecology & Env management
Back to Top
administrator View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 01 Jan 2007
Status: Offline
Points: 10
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote administrator Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Feb 2006 at 11:03am

Steve, I confidently identify this as a small brown furry thing like many I see under tins.

Where's Brett Lewis when you need him eh?

Back to Top
Iowarth View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 12 Apr 2004
Status: Offline
Points: 740
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Iowarth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb 2006 at 3:45pm
On the whole I go with Gemma's identification "small brown furry thing"! But, looking at the colour, the underside, very furry ears and so far as I can see no change of colour on the rump I would stick my neck out and say Field Vole - Microtus agrestis
Chris Davis, Site Administrator

Co-ordinator, Sand Lizard Captive Breeding Programme (RETIRED)
Back to Top
Danial View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 01 May 2003
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 100
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Danial Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Feb 2006 at 1:38pm
Yes tins are really good for small mammals.
I've found Wood mice, Common shrews and Field voles under tins. The most frequently found species is the one identified by Chris in the pic as the Field vole.

I've also been lucky enough to find a nest of baby voles under a tin.
Back to Top
evilmike View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 15 May 2004
Status: Offline
Points: 85
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote evilmike Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Feb 2006 at 9:21pm

baby voleeees indeed are a very good find, think ive had 4 different nests now. find most tiles on the road projects have mammal tunnels under them where theyve been out for the summer. The ones pictured were from an abandoned allotment i did a community project on, unfortunately it was all rotovated but.... i caught the female, and transfered her with her 3 little blind babies to a very large tank at home, they all survived and were very interesting to watch growing up and exploring the until they were released when they were ready to go :( the amount of grass clippings they ate was absolutely amazing!

 

Mike Lister BSc hons Ecology & Env management
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.06
Copyright ©2001-2016 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.078 seconds.