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fungi 2011

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Chris d View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chris d Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Oct 2011 at 9:29pm
Here's a pic of a very large Dryad that I found earlier in the summer. I've just noticed that in the Philips it states that it is edible while in the Collins nature guide it says that it is poisonous. I thought that it was good to eat. An obvious error !!?
 
 
I had a walk around the forest today, I only found a few very sorry looking washed out Agarics. Is this the end of the mushroom season? Has anyone any suggestions on what to do for the next 6 months ?  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Iowarth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Oct 2011 at 9:56pm

Hibernate??  Smile

Better still - can you get to any of the many winter tasks?

Chris

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chris d Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Oct 2011 at 6:07pm
Thats what I was thinking, hibernating sounds great. And as for winter tasks......they can wait for spring !!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Liz Heard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Oct 2011 at 6:13pm
find a young fresh one and you can eat it Chris. however if youre anything like me then you may well find the very mealy smell of these off-putting. older specimens are a bit tough and chewy too.

obviously Autumn is when you find the most fungi but there are species fruiting year round (inc edibles) - even in Winter. like (easy to ID and tasty) Velvet Shanks and Pleurotus.
November's first frosts signal the end of many spp but (at least 'round 'ere) there is still one very common (in pasture/heathland) succulent and mouth-watering esculent to come.
the late-fruiting and exquisitely beautiful Field Blewit (Lepista saeva)
Locally at least, these spring up a bit later than most Autumn 'shrooms and indeed, ive picked November specimens frozen so rock hard that i couldve clubbed a passing dog walker to death and later eaten the murder weapon to hide the evidence
i even found a couple of Field Blewits in Spring once - me n kevinb were most surprised!
keep your eye out for em!

have you thought of joining your local fungus group?

Chris' practical Winter Blues-busting suggestion is sound.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Iowarth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Oct 2011 at 6:21pm

But.... but...............

Winter tasks are done in winter!! Honest, guv!!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Noodles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Oct 2011 at 3:42pm
Bring on the blewits!!!!!!!!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AGILIS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Oct 2011 at 4:55pm
hI awl werse oot loking fore sum snooks & adders in v ever n cums acrawse sums pritty red mushroooms so ise tasted em an seems 2 ave lost me car but sum pritty blue flashing lites keeps making a eck of a racket on v track keef
   LOCAL ICYNICAL CELTIC ECO WARRIOR AND FAILED DRUID
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kevinb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Oct 2011 at 10:09am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Noodles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Oct 2011 at 5:25pm
Need the man say more? Like little guilded temple domes breaking through the morning mist in some far off eastern city.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Liz Heard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Oct 2011 at 7:50pm
Originally posted by Scale Scale wrote:

Bring on the blewits!!!!!!!!!


Damn right!
same goes for Kevs finds which, in addition to sporting "come hither" nipples, have stems which (unlike the various similar Panaeolus spp) wave beckoningly at the observer - as if to say "here i am, come and get me!"
are those still in situ?

Couple of Russula.



possibly The Sickener (Russula emetica)
(Fungi rival moths for names eh? Similar bewildering range of species too!);



Have you tried Fairy Ring Champignons Marasmius oreades yet Chris D (jnr)?
very tasty little buggers and common in troupes or rings on lawns and cricket pitches. they make up for their small size by being prolific.
Recommended!

Be careful though. the deadly poisonous Clitocybe dealbata/rivulosa look similar and occupy a similar niche BUT have a different gill arrangement (they are crowded and decurrent) and have more "depressed" caps. not an umbo like FRC;






Keith, hope you enjoyed the enlightening experience. LOL!
in a day or two you will probably find you feel refreshed; as if the troublesome cloud of worry that has dogged your daily life for months or years has been banished by a single sweep of a magic Myco wand! LOL!
im certainly not advocating anything (one has to make one's own choices and be responsible for them) but interestingly, it is now recognised that psychotropics have medicinal potential -particularly in treating addiction and depression.
one of the most powerful of these non-addictive chemicals (DMT) occurs naturally in living things ranging from grasses to human beings.
its the stuff that brings your dreams every night.
Read up if you dont believe me!


cheers, Ben
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