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fungi 2011

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Noodles View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Noodles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Oct 2011 at 10:11am
Looks a bit like Lemon peel fungus??
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Chris d View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chris d Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Oct 2011 at 7:54pm
That is what I thought Ben, either the death cap or false death cap. Could the previous yellow one be Chantelle ? I'd put it down as something else but it is similar in shape and colour, the only thing is it wasn't found in woodland but rather in the middle of a field. 
The pic below was taken in June this year, in a coniferous forest and is quite common in that area. At a guess Russula feotens ? Below that is a Russula atropurpurea ?
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Liz Heard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Oct 2011 at 10:40pm
beautiful Chris - the shrooms and the pix.
as was Calebs mystery lemon entry. i would chase my local fungus group or ispot for an ID of that one!
sorry to report, ive no cyanescens (or The Potent Psilocybe as its often now referred to) pix.
nor P crobulus.
ive gotta find more woodchip piles! i read 100,000 fruiting bodies (of Pc were found at a site in Surrey. whoa! what a sight that must have been.

looks like they could well be Russula Chris.
agree tawny grisette and have you ruled out wax caps for the others?

found these dense scaly clusters at the base of a tree today.
Shaggy Pholiota Pholiota squarrosa (not edible) methinx;



shame you dont get Scooby or Phred Pholiotas.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Caleb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Oct 2011 at 9:04am
Originally posted by Scale Scale wrote:

Looks a bit like Lemon peel fungus??


Not as cup-like as though, it was very flat. I've not got any better suggestion, though... maybe I'll take it to ispot as Ben suggested.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Noodles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Oct 2011 at 10:46am
Caleb, try domicile cup fungus (Peziza domiciliana). Apparently these are commonly encountered growing out from under damp linos/carpets/skirting boards etc and can be flat despite the name. I did a survey of some disused Nissen huts a while back. The ceiling had collapsed in one location and the carpet was sodden; a similar fungus to this was growing up from it, as well as a range of the more traditional looking fungi. It was quite surreal.
 
Chris, as Ben suggested, i would think that your 'Chanterelle' is probably a mature example of a Golden wax-cap. They tend to flare up at the edges with age, giving the gills a decurrent appearence. The mycological marvel that is Arvensis may well correct me, however. I am certainly no expert, just a dawdling amateur who left his Rodger Phillips book in a ditch somewhere two years ago. Now that would be the mycological find of the year if you were an amateur 'shroomer. At least it would for me, i have to make do with my slightly less thorough Thomas Laessoe book. 
Cheers


Edited by Scale - 12 Oct 2011 at 10:48am
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Chris d View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chris d Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Oct 2011 at 7:38pm
Thanks, Scale and Ben,
I think that you're right about that the pic is not of a Chanterelle. While refering to my Yoda book I happened to open it at the page showing the "Deceiver"  Laccaria laccata as another option ??   
 
Caleb, sorry wasn't ignoring your post but as an amateur can't help much. 
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Chris d View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chris d Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Oct 2011 at 8:03pm
Found these a few weeks ago from 2 different sites, Aminita pantherina  
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Caleb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Oct 2011 at 9:31am
Originally posted by Scale Scale wrote:

Caleb, try domicile cup fungus (Peziza domiciliana). Apparently these are commonly encountered growing out from under damp linos/carpets/skirting boards etc and can be flat despite the name.


Aha, that looks more like it! Thanks.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Liz Heard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Oct 2011 at 7:01pm
hi Chris,

you were there and i wasnt so ive only got your pix to go on, but how sure are you that those are panthers?
like you (and unlike Mark!) im no expert either but i do know that AP - aka The False Blusher - are ( unlike the true - and more ubiquitous) TRUE Blusher, rather uncommon.
they are regularly misidentified.
plus i think i can see (what looks like) tell-tale traces of "pinking" in both the gills and stipe of your 2nd pic.

Blushers are quite variable in appearance.
Panthers have a (useful for ID) circumventing "roll" (like a polo-necked jumper) at the top of the basal volva, a preference for beech woods and an unpleasant smell if that helps.
did you sniff it - thats often a useful ID hint with fungi?!

certainly cant say with confidence that yours AREN'T AP though!
Perhaps Mark or Scale will know better than i?

great pix (again) and thanks for posting.

cheers

Edited by ben rigsby - 14 Oct 2011 at 8:10pm
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Chris d View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chris d Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Oct 2011 at 8:40pm
Hi Ben,
You could be right I automatically assumed that it was a Panther after referencing it in the Phillips book, without looking for other options. Thanks for the info regarding identifying the Panther. I can't find the False Blusher in the book, what is the Latin name so I can compare them ? I can't remember where I saw them as they were from 2 different locations.
 
Cheers,
Chris  
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