the online meeting place for all who love our amphibians and reptiles
Home Page Live Forums Archived Forums Site Search Identify Record Donate Projects Links
Forum Home Forum Home > General > Photography
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - First real field test with Nikon 105mm F/2.8D.
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

First real field test with Nikon 105mm F/2.8D.

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <123
Author
Message
Testudo Man View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 11 Apr 2012
Location: Kent
Status: Offline
Points: 91
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Testudo Man Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Mar 2014 at 11:46am
Some other images shot on the 22/2/14.
All these pics have been cropped, just another experiment, to see how the pics cope with various size crops. Same lens used as 1st images. Cropping could have been anything up to 50% of originals. It would seem that this lens allows quite a large crop into the image, whilst maintaining a good result. However most of my re-sized images are small files(typically approx 600 x 450) for most of them. If i displayed these cropped images at their full cropped size, then they would probably lose quality.

This was shot in manual - 1/2000 F8 ISO 1800.




This was shot in Sports mode - 1/1600 F7.1 ISO 400.



This was also shot in Sports Mode - 1/1000 F4 ISO 800.





Edited by Testudo Man - 02 Mar 2014 at 11:49am
Back to Top
Tom Omlette View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 07 Nov 2013
Location: Stoke on Trent
Status: Offline
Points: 444
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tom Omlette Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Mar 2014 at 10:08pm
@ tm - fair dooz if the scene modes work for you then you can't say fairer than that, and they are very good images. the first one is amazing for iso 1800!!!

when i jumped from pocket sized compact to dslr a pro photographer friend of mine gave me some advice - "you've spent a lot of money on a very sophisticated piece of equipment, learn how to use it or else you'll just have a very very expensive point and shoot camera!" i thought it was a bit ott at the time but know what he meant now and am glad i took it on board. 

but as you say, sometimes good to get a few shots in when you can, knowing they'll be ok then worry about getting everything exactly how you want it if you get the chance.

@ gemma apart from the herp a day thread haven't seen many pics from you for ages. looking forward to seeing many more this year.

tom
Back to Top
Testudo Man View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 11 Apr 2012
Location: Kent
Status: Offline
Points: 91
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Testudo Man Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Mar 2014 at 9:53pm
Originally posted by Tom Omlette Tom Omlette wrote:

@ tm - fair dooz if the scene modes work for you then you can't say fairer than that, and they are very good images. the first one is amazing for iso 1800!!!

when i jumped from pocket sized compact to dslr a pro photographer friend of mine gave me some advice - "you've spent a lot of money on a very sophisticated piece of equipment, learn how to use it or else you'll just have a very very expensive point and shoot camera!" i thought it was a bit ott at the time but know what he meant now and am glad i took it on board. 

but as you say, sometimes good to get a few shots in when you can, knowing they'll be ok then worry about getting everything exactly how you want it if you get the chance.

@ gemma apart from the herp a day thread haven't seen many pics from you for ages. looking forward to seeing many more this year.

tom


Thanks for your comments.
In Sports mode, ISO max's out at 1600. But in Manual mode ISO could be anywhere!
I dont set ISO for specific numbers, i have ISO on Auto. My reason for this is the light/weather changes constantly. One minute the sun is out, next minute its cloudy! so rather than mess around with too many settings(and by doing this, theres a good chance of missing the shot) i want my camera to shoot fast. As you know, you come across a snake in the wild, and as a rule, you dont have a lot of time before the snake slithers off fast(especially with my close up style) so i need to get in quick, capture some images, and move on.
I often forget about composition as well, i have to remind myself mid shoot, to think more about the composition of the image. Embarrassed

As ive said before, i'll be the 1st to admit that ive only "scratched the surface" of the capabilities of a DSLR...but im getting there Wink

Ive shot some very interesting adder images over these last couple of days(using this 105mm macro lens) so hope to start to process/edit them soon enough. They could just be, my best adder images to date!


Back to Top
GemmaJF View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 Jan 2003
Location: Essex
Status: Offline
Points: 4312
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GemmaJF Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Mar 2014 at 8:39am
Interesting!

This is why I still love this forum, different approaches and techniques.

For getting close-up I'm totally the opposite. There is no rush at all, in fact I can be in the same spot not even moving for an hour! 

Your sport mode technique is how I use Tv mode. But I will set ISO manually for light conditions. I use this as I approach the animal, not trying to get too close at first. As I approach I will get on the ground and start to crawl towards the animal! Even through the nettles and brambles. When I'm really close I switch to Av mode. Here I go for the smallest aperture opening I can for increased DOF, again manual ISO is pretty essential in anything but the brightest sun, else shutter speed can be too slow for a useable shot.

What one finds if you can get 'in the habitat' with the animals, sooner or later they figure out you are not there to eat them, I got some shots of a lizard yesterday in the garden, it was coming up to inspect the lens! The key thing is to be there when they are warming up in the morning. Their urge to get up to operating temperature will overcome their instinct to flee until they get use to you being there.

Hope the insight to my own methods is of some help. (It helped to remind me what I use to do if nothing else!)

Looking forward to the adder shots Smile


Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <123
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.06
Copyright ©2001-2016 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.063 seconds.