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Fairly certain its a smooth newt.

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PsYcHoTiCMaDmAn View Drop Down
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    Posted: 06 Oct 2008 at 4:48pm



rescued off the road.






again rescued of the road, penny was for size comparison.

wondering about attempting to captive breed some to release into some nature ponds/marshy area when their big enough.
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tim hamlett View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tim hamlett Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Oct 2008 at 7:19am

hi...nice pics

are you sure they're smooth and not palmate newts?

tim

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dave fixx View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dave fixx Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Oct 2008 at 11:56am
Nice pics.Pop a pond in the garden(if possible) and in my experiance you will have no trouble breeding them.If they are in the area they will normally find your pond.
   Breeding in tanks is a different matter and one I have zilch knowledge for so cant help.Judging by their size I would say your a couple of years at least off breeding though.
Dave Williams
davewilliamsphotography.co.uk
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tim hamlett View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tim hamlett Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Oct 2008 at 12:17pm

newts will breed in a tank. you need natural water, food and the right sort of weeds for the females to lay their eggs. however, i would definitely agree with dave and put a pond in. it only has to be small and you will still easily be able to monitor the newts progress etc. you'll get other wildlife too.

tim

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Suzi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Oct 2008 at 3:58pm
I have newts in my pond but I have only had glimpses of them and never see young. I look at night also with a  torch. My brother has bred them in tanks - at least you can see them easily.
Suz
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Peter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Oct 2008 at 5:11pm

A pond is the favourite, and you can always set up an aquarium to observe courtship behaviour for a week or two during the season as well as egg laying if you provide some oxygenating plants.    

Looking at the solid continuation of the dorsal line on the tail, I would say that you have palmate newts.  Any shots of the animal`s throat?

BLF Dragonscapes Habitats officer
Amphibian and Reptile Conservation
e: peter.hill@arc-trust.org
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PsYcHoTiCMaDmAn View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PsYcHoTiCMaDmAn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Oct 2008 at 9:41am
no decent photos of the throat, most of mine I tried to get near eye level or above.

plus I keep the camera in full manual, so need both hands, so getting the newt into position wouldn't be easy

however, I did find another newt outside last night, and it looked quite different to what I was used to. about twice as big as the babies, but 1/3-1/2 smaller than the adult pictured at the beginning.




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Peter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Oct 2008 at 1:38pm
Looks like it may be a male palmate.   It would be worth your while getting throat and belly shots (another pair of hands could assist you in this regard) which would make ID a good deal easier.
BLF Dragonscapes Habitats officer
Amphibian and Reptile Conservation
e: peter.hill@arc-trust.org
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tim hamlett Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Oct 2008 at 5:26pm

yep...palmates

tim

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote calumma Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Oct 2008 at 4:01am
Definitely palmate, one of the key things to look at is the dorsal stripe -
particularly useful for identifying efts.

In smooth newts, the stripe disappears along the back. In palmates it
continues down the tail.
Lee Brady

Kent Herpetofauna Recorder | Independent Ecological Consultant



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