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Evaluating population sizes and capture e

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Iowarth View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Iowarth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Aug 2005 at 12:20pm

Gemma, thanks for posting that link.

Tony, your paper is excellent and gives a tremendous and hitherto lacking insight into adders and their behaviour. I think you also illustrate by contrast one of the great weaknesses of most research. Very seldom does it involve genuine detailed long term study of any of our native herps in their wild state - all too often, the opposite - short term studies in artificial conditions based on unwarranted assumptions leading to foregone conclusions.

I for one deeply admire the dedication you have put into your studies and regard your work not only as invaluable but as an example of what should be done if we are going to gain a thorough understanding of our herps.

Thanks again

(That's all, grovelling congratulations aren't my style even when so thoroughly deserved!)

Chris Davis, Site Administrator

Co-ordinator, Sand Lizard Captive Breeding Programme (RETIRED)
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Iowarth View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Iowarth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Aug 2005 at 1:00pm

Cheers Tony - was that tears of hysterical laughter?

Seriously it is damned good. And a shining example. Can't wait to see the rest (but you're not going to charge $40 per seven pages are you?)

And I wouldn't worry - a lot of people die young for lack of interest. You're not going to have that problem - keep going - being in your age group I just hope I that I am around to see the results!

Chris Davis, Site Administrator

Co-ordinator, Sand Lizard Captive Breeding Programme (RETIRED)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Barry Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Aug 2005 at 2:51pm
When I started this topic I never thought we'd end up quoting Carl Sagan and talking about UFO's !

So, can we wrap0 it up - who wants to see some updated,reasonably sensible criteria for population assessment - limit your answers to no less than 6 words !!

And Tony, I hope you do live to 104, or at least until next Tuesday when we're due to meet !!
Barry Kemp - Sussex Amphibian & Reptile Group
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Suzi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Aug 2005 at 8:15pm

Would it be possible that chosen methods for evaluating pop. size if standardised across the country might prove misleading?

I'm thinking of refugia, ground temp, air temp etc. and wondering if any of you who have worked in both the warmer and cooler counties might have noticed distinct differences in reptile visibility that could lead to misleading evaluations.

Suz
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rhysrkid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Aug 2005 at 2:38pm
When I was in Malaysia a herpetologist I was working with said to me: "I wish someone would invent a set of goggles that makes vegetation transparent, leaving all the herps suspended in mid-air.  It would make surveying a hell of a lot easier...".  Sometimes I'm inclined to agree with him!  It would certainly make popn estimates a little less of a headache!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Mar 2017 at 1:41pm
Hi Everyone

I am currently doing a dissertation on this very subject (with regard to Common Lizards) for an MSc and wondered if there were any scientific papers out there that anyone could refer me to. I've had a look and there doesn't seem to be anything specific re Common Lizard population estimates. Was any work done since this forum thread was started? Any help would be much appreciated. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GemmaJF Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Mar 2017 at 7:26pm
I do not know anything specific for common lizards. I think perhaps look for papers regarding population estimates for reptiles and amphibians in general. 

If you take a look at the Narrs protocols it does mention software such as MARK and gives a couple of references to scientific papers on pages 4/5


Not sure about your idea for photography. They are not like newts that can easily be put in a squish box, though there may be others who have had success with doing so. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Robert V Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Apr 2017 at 2:10pm
Gemma / Karen,
 
the guidance in the NARRS protocols still suggests repeat capture and re-capture "techniques", but today the generally accepted opinion is that capture (let alone repeated capture) of Grass Snakes, Adders etc, impacts negatively on their lives.
 
It's all very well looking to study such an endearing little creature as the common lizard, but maybe from a distance. I fully appreciate that this "research" may not give the fancy pie charts and axis data graphs that are so loved by educational establishments when marking papers (they appear to give little value to field craft and welfare of the animals involved) but there you are.
 
I can walk through one of my favourite spots and see loads of them charging about.
 
I would tell the "record pool" or anyone else as some people on this forum seem to think (not you gemma don't worry) its ok to go and collect up polymorphs, take them from site, DNA sample them etc etc, and completely upset the daily bio rhythms 9if that's how you spell it!) of the sites.
 
Karen, I can show you a terrific site in Essex, but I'd need a reassurance of complete security of site information, location, everything. Even in your MSc.
 
R
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Robert V View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Robert V Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Apr 2017 at 2:11pm
That should be wouldn't tell, not would! Lol
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Robert V Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Apr 2017 at 2:16pm
And you come across individuals like this that has just lost some of his tail but otherwise looks to be in good health...
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