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Dungeness 21 April 2018

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chubsta View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chubsta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Apr 2018 at 9:32am
I guess they grow in very varied environments, yours appear to be in a very boggy soil whereas ours were all along a pretty high sandy bank in a very dry area with minimal rainfall for the UK.
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Liz Heard View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Liz Heard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Apr 2018 at 10:29am
Yes, suddenly appearing almost anywhere is a characteristic they are noted for; from ancient grassland, hedgebanks and roadside verges to 'waste' ground, bare
soil and gardens on various soil types.
There was even a report of Morels on some mud beside the doorstep of a house in the inner city a while back.

Some literature suggests a preference for sandy substrates so maybe that's why you found such an abundance.
Curiously, they're also known to favour ground that's been burnt. In Europe this has previously led to fires being deliberately started in an effort to encourage them.

Numerous attempts have been made to cultivate the beloved Morel, but always unsuccessfully as far as i'm aware.

These fungi still have plenty of secrets to give up!
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Tom Omlette View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tom Omlette Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 May 2018 at 9:46pm
still get a thrill seeing my first magic mushroom of the season Confused. you're never too old suz lol!


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Liz Heard View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Liz Heard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 May 2018 at 11:54pm
Encountering them is still thrilling for me too, although i haven't been anywhere teeming with clumps of them for years.
Aside from the psychedelic/forbidden allure/notoriety, what with their (a)cute 'nipple' heads and 'bent wire' stems they are a very beautiful and distinctive species.

Several further species have been designated 'hallucinogenic' since my - or our - youth, and i'm still hoping to get pix of (anyone seen it?), the big one -
Psilocybe cyanescens. They have caramel-coloured, wavy-edged caps and presence of the active compounds is indicated by the heavy 'blueing' of the stem. For the record, one of these reportedly equates to 10 'regulars'.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psilocybe_cyanescens

This is a North American species most commonly seen on (untreated) woodchips, often around parks and gardens. They can occur in profusion and are said to be most frequent from the home counties region where they were first found (early 20th C) - London/Epping Forest among the hotspots.

Edited by Liz Heard - 18 May 2018 at 7:48am
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