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Can newt larvae move their gills?

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Adderz View Drop Down
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    Posted: 12 Jan 2012 at 7:35pm
Hi All,
 
Just wondered if anyone on here can answer this simple question that has me puzzling! Can newt larvae (GCN or small Sp.) move their gills? i.e. Are they controlled by muscles. I have checked in a few books and can find no mention of it!
 
Cheers
 
Rob
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will View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote will Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Jan 2012 at 10:19pm
Hi Rob

I've seen well grown crested newt larvae trying to flush oxygenated water across the gills by moving them back and forth in overcrowded desiccating ponds, so I guess they can.  Interesting Q!

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Will
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Noodles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jan 2012 at 10:35am
Indeed they do. The gill stems from which the breather filaments protrude largely comprise muscle tissue. As Will points out this aids oxygen intake by actively flushing or passively increasing/exposing surface area. It also presumably helps protect against predator, or other physical, damage. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Adderz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jan 2012 at 2:28pm
Thanks for the responses! It is just one of those questions that popped into my head and I thought I should know the answer, but didn't!
Cheers
 
Rob 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Noodles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Feb 2012 at 4:20pm
I noticed a tank off Axolotls flexing their gill pistons at the yokel Dobbies garden centre t'other day. The stems appeared to be quite mobile and on occasion seemed to move independent of one another. I'm sure the same might apply to newt larvae. 
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