the online meeting place for all who love our amphibians and reptiles
Home Page Live Forums Archived Forums Site Search Identify Record Donate Projects Links
Forum Home Forum Home > Alien & Naturalised species of the UK > Naturalised
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Aesculapian snake
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Aesculapian snake

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 567
Author
Message
JaySteel View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 07 May 2010
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 144
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JaySteel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Jul 2011 at 10:55pm
Thanks guys.
Back to Top
will View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 27 Feb 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 1709
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote will Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jul 2011 at 8:16am
Hi Jay - I guess I do feel quite protective of them, both as individuals I've got to know over the last four years but also because they may become part of a study which could help with 'proper' conservation of relict Aesculapian populations (and those of other snakes, for example our own adders) by providing useful info on inbreeding, population dynamics etc).  You're right that they're longer than you'd think when you see them coiled up - snake 7 is around 1.3m, I think.
Back to Top
Robert V View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 06 Aug 2004
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 1243
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Robert V Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Jan 2017 at 10:28am
Oi
RobV
Back to Top
Robert V View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 06 Aug 2004
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 1243
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Robert V Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Jan 2017 at 10:35am
Hi all ye that survive! Lol
 
I thought I'd regurgitate this thread as I came across an interesting snippet in an ancient archive of anecdotes called Wild Animals in Captivity by A D Bartlett, the superintendent of Regents Park zoo during the late 1800's.
 

REPTILE HOUSE.

The old reptile house became unfit for the safe keeping

of the lizards, venomous snakes and other reptiles that

were deposited therein. It is very fortunate that no

serious accidents occurred by reason of some of them

having made their escape. The practice of feeding some

of the snakes upon tame white mice was looked upon by

many of the lady and children visitors as cruel. When I

was spoken to, and written to, on the subject I took

adv.antage of a suggestion that the common brown mouse,

of which we had more than enough, would answer for

feeding purposes quite as well as white ones. I therefore

had mouse-traps set in all directions, and supplied the

wild instead of the tame white ones.

 

I soon discovered my mistake. These wild brown mice,

if not killed directly, were soon engaged in gnawing their

way out of the case, and the same opening which they

made also allowed some of the snakes to follow. The

tame white mice seldom or never attempt to gnaw their

way out. Years after the old reptile house had been

disused, harmless snakes that had escaped in this way

were found in the mill-room underneath the old house.

They had doubtless lived upon the rats and mice that

swarmed in this place.

 

The keeper of the reptile house came to me one day

and told me that he had missed one of the cobras. I

examined the empty cobra case, and found a mouse-hole in

the corner leading into the water-viper's case. The water-viper

appeared to have lately fed and to be well filled out, and

I had some misgivings that the lost cobra,

in creeping through the mouse-hole, had been caught and

swallowed by the water-viper.

 

The fear, coupled with the anxiety of thinking that so

dangerous a serpent as a cobra was at liberty, caused me

to determine to settle the question at once. I had the

water- viper killed, and, upon examination, found the nearly

digested cobra, which was a great relief to me and all the

others. 
RobV
Back to Top
Paul Ford View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 06 Sep 2006
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 195
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paul Ford Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Jan 2017 at 11:15am
Very interesting Rob!

Thanks
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 567
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.06
Copyright ©2001-2016 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.047 seconds.